You are viewing cyclic profile data from three women, the subjects of a small clinical trial of a prototype of our Ovulona device. The records are superimposed on each other on the day of the ovulation marker (a standard procedure in obgyn research, day 0). All three profiles exhibit the same features that are merely positioned differently along the time axis. Meaning that things that give rise to the features are happening at different rates of speed in the different women. This is the menstrual cyclic pattern - or cyclic profile - that this project is all about. Bottom line is this: The multitude of repeatable features of the cyclic pattern makes it possible to determine the boundaries of the fertile window for every individual cycle. This is why our technology can be used for birth control – and also for baby gender planning - whereas the prior art (meaning: older) technologies cannot. The older techniques do NOT have a multitude of measurable features in their cyclic profiles, and CANNOT therefore determine the boundaries of the fertile window. A key distinction of our technique is that the “dynamic range” of data (the vertical span) is the same in all cycles and in all women. This – in addition to the repeatable features of the pattern - facilitates electronic interpretation of the data. Only the timing of the various features varies from cycle to cycle, and we work with that. The cyclic pattern exhibits a number of well-defined peaks and troughs, with the first post-menstruation minimum (or trough, nadir) occurring typically already on day 6, 7 or 8. The signal then rises to a maximum (long-term predictive peak), the highest level of the cycle. Over the next several days, the readings fall toward the minimum before the short-term predictive peak. We have found the ovulation-marker minimum to correlate with urinary LH and FSH peaks (hormones). Based on data, we interpret the ovulation marker to be an effect of the steroid hormone switch that occurs at ovulation (estrogen to progesterone regime).
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